Christian Writing Mood Writing

Johne

Senior Member
Staff member
Sep 27, 2005
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I don't save such scenes for when I'm feeling a certain way, but I've written such things out of order when I'm in a certain mood.
 
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May 8, 2022
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Thanks for the nod

Yes I do. To me it’s just another reason why many people say” the book was better than the movie”.

With a movie it’s about music and fake people pretending to create what you feel. Take away music alone and a movie has nothing. You can watch the most brutal scene in a movie when it’s on mute

But a book… that has emotion. Write the emotional scenes when you are in the right mood and the emotion of that just leaps off the page
 
Jan 7, 2020
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(I’m one of those boring linear types)
Lol. Didn't know linear types were boring... lol (I'm pretty linear too...). reminds me of the math jokes about not being such a square - at the same time, being round is 'pointless' ;)

I do and I don't.

There are times when I want to write but choose not to because I am not in the mood for that specific scene. However, there are many times where I tune myself into my character to such a degree of empathy that my emotions are effected.

In that way, I let my emotions follow my writing when I can. As they say, emotions are great servants but terrible masters... and I'm sure if we all waited until our emotions were perfectly aligned with the scenes and characters, we would nary ever finish a single story... but there is a balance somewhere in there.

I lost track of how many times I've caused myself to cry when writing emotional scenes, empathizing with my characters.
 
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Zee

Mar 1, 2019
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Thanks for the nod

Yes I do. To me it’s just another reason why many people say” the book was better than the movie”.

With a movie it’s about music and fake people pretending to create what you feel. Take away music alone and a movie has nothing. You can watch the most brutal scene in a movie when it’s on mute

I don’t think I agree with all of that, but I think you’re on to something when you say it’s the emotion created that makes people say that a book was better than a movie. The process of reading requires more than that of watching, so the mental and emotional investment is greater…bringing greater returns, you might say.
 
May 19, 2021
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I don't really write according to my mood, my mood shifts according to what I write! Sometimes. Not all the time. But if I'm writing anything emotional for my characters, I have a bad habit of picking up that emotion. When my character is angry, I get really tense. When my character's uncomfortable, I get a bit of that. I tend to pick up on their emotions and accidentally get emotional. Which is annoying if I'm writing something that makes the characters tense, 'cause then I'M all tense...
 
Apr 5, 2019
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A comment of @FeatherPen ’s inspired me to ask—how many of you write according to your mood—save a sad scene in your story for when you’re feeling sad, for example?

This technique has never occurred to me (I’m one of those boring linear types) but it sounds interesting.
I listen to select music when I want to write a specific mood.

I find that waiting to be sad to write sad is not only unreliable with it's timing, it tends to result in an awful result.,
 

Zee

Mar 1, 2019
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I find that waiting to be sad to write sad is not only unreliable with it's timing, it tends to result in an awful result.,

Well, that leads to another question…

for those of you who do create writing through deep emotions, do you find it harder to look at it objectively, or accept others’ critiques for that reason?

I find it hard enough to be objective as it is…
 
May 8, 2022
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Well, that leads to another question…

for those of you who do create writing through deep emotions, do you find it harder to look at it objectively, or accept others’ critiques for that reason?

I find it hard enough to be objective as it is…
No, but I am unique in how I write. After the first draft I use Excel to chart a lot of changes so I get things right without having to rewrite

One thing I chart is the emotional level of scenes.

I just give the scenes a number -10 to +10

So for instance a couple reaching the point of a kiss would be a +10 because they are on an emotional high. A funeral scene would be a -10 because it’s depressing, and of course other scenes vary between those two extremes.

Using the assigned numbers, and excels ease at making line graphs I can chart my novel from start to finish on an emotional level. With that I can then make changes to my story to take out flat areas so my readers have a ride and falling sense of emotion as they read

In a movie they use music to accomplish this you just never notice music there when it’s done well. You only notice the music when it’s bad because it does not mimic how you are feeling as you watch the movie

With novels it is the emotional descriptors that make the book so memorable and loved. It is NOT characterization. It is in feeling the EMOTIONS of the characters that readers attribute the novel to “great characterization”.
 
May 8, 2022
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From your question I can see that you don’t understand what I am getting at, so I will try and explain it better.

The best example I can think of is “Where the Red Fern Grows”. Many of us in grade school read that book and is memorable because of the shocking moment when the dog is shot.

Many readers would say it was because of the characters of the boy and dog that make it so memorable, but tgg bc at is not tgg he e case.

We had 3/4 of a novel showing the emotional attachment of the boy with the boy that makes the bullet so profound, and the book so memorable.

The author amazingly got the emotion of the book right as it rose and fell to that defining moment

I see a lot of authors struggling over perfect character names, background and interactions, but it’s the emotions as it’s being read that makes the novel truly memorable… when done correctly
 
Jan 7, 2020
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for those of you who do create writing through deep emotions, do you find it harder to look at it objectively, or accept others’ critiques for that reason?
honestly, yes... when I write with deep emotions, it is hard to look at it objectively, and I tend to have to set it aside for a day or two (making sure NOT TO REPLY to the critique) before being able to see it more objectively. And then the critique is usually spot-on and makes the scene even better. :)
 

Virginia Winterstorm

Junior Member
May 5, 2011
263
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Thanks for the nod

Yes I do. To me it’s just another reason why many people say” the book was better than the movie”.

With a movie it’s about music and fake people pretending to create what you feel. Take away music alone and a movie has nothing. You can watch the most brutal scene in a movie when it’s on mute

But a book… that has emotion. Write the emotional scenes when you are in the right mood and the emotion of that just leaps off the page
You are so right on about this. My sister always told me the book is better.
 

Virginia Winterstorm

Junior Member
May 5, 2011
263
18
honestly, yes... when I write with deep emotions, it is hard to look at it objectively, and I tend to have to set it aside for a day or two (making sure NOT TO REPLY to the critique) before being able to see it more objectively. And then the critique is usually spot-on and makes the scene even better. :)
Good point. When someone makes us angry or a situation causes you to get angry, immediately we go into defense mode and fight back with hurt words, etc... It is best to weigh it before responding.
Like the people say when using Facebook, TikTok, etc...once it's out there, it's out there.
 

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